Cutaways

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I started making these cutaways for my own understanding. Over the years they have come in handy explaining things to employees and customers. Some of the valves are new but most are old pieces that I have pulled out of jobs over the years. You can click on the pictures to see an enlarged view.

Ball Valve
Ball Valve

This is the type of valve we use for the majority of applications today. They are durable and easy to use. The handle turns the ball inside 90 degrees, opening and closing the valve.
Butterfly Valve
Butterfly Valve

The handle on this valve also turns 90 degrees but instead of turning a ball it turns a disk. There is rubber around the edge of the disk that seals against the valve body when it's closed. This is a more compact type of valve that is often used for larger diameter pipes.
Lead Joint
Wiped Lead Ball Joint

This piece was taken from a water service line coming into a house. Lead pipe cannot be threaded because it is too soft, so a special brass fitting called a wiped nipple was butted against the pipe. More lead would then be melted and wiped around the joint sealing the connection.
Wiped Curb Stop
Wiped Curb-Stop

Curb-Stops are underground shut-off valves. They are usually located in the parkway and allow the city to remotely shut off your water. This is an old model made for lead pipe. You can see how the above wiped lead joint would be made on both sides of the valve.
Lead Cupped Joint
Lead Cupped Joint

This is another type of lead connection seen mostly on drain lines which is a thinner walled pipe. Here the lead was connected to a male adapter, but this joint could just as well connect two pieces of lead.
Lead Joint
Lead Cupped Joint

In this picture you can see the lead pipe was flared out and the male adapter pushed inside the pipe. Then melted lead was wiped in the space between the two, sealing the joint.
Streamline Fittings
Streamline Fittings

Here are three original "Streamline" brand brass solder fittings by Mueller Co. shown next to three new copper solder fittings. These were the first solder type fittings for copper pipe. All these fittings are for 1/2" I.D. copper tube.
Lead Joint
Streamline Fittings

This Streamline advertisement is from the 1950's. You can see the case being made for copper pipe and fittings. Copper is a much better pipe material for carrying water than galvanized pipe because it does not rust and corrode over time.
Crane CAT.440
Crane CAT.440

Crane Co. made the best brass gate valves I've come across. All of these valves are old examples that I've pulled out of service over the years. Although they don't look like it, because I've had them cleaned, I'd say the average age is more than 50 years. Crane's main manufacturing plant used to be in Chicago on S. Kenzie Ave.

Often times when you try to operate old valves of other brands the handle crumbles in your hand or the stem strips out. This never happens with a Crane valve because they were built especially rugged using high quality brass.
Crane Gate Valve
Crane CAT.440

Here you can see the inside of the valve. It's a rising stem which means the stem and handle rises or lowers when it is turned. It has a two piece gate which expands to seal when closed.
Crane CAT.431-UB
Crane CAT.431-UB

Rising stem gate valve with a solid gate. This is a higher pressure model that has an extra nut around the bonnett allowing for higher pressure. There is also a piece around the packing nut which Crane calls a glad hand, this helps secure the packing around the stem.
Crane CAT.410
Crane CAT. 410

This is a non-rising stem gate valve. The threads of the stem travel inside the gate rather than along the bonnet. This makes it more compact than the rising stem models.
Crane Globe
Crane CAT.7

Brass globe valve. This type of valve is directional. The flow of water would come from the bottom, through the opening in the middle, and out the top. They are used when throttling the amount of water is needed.
Crane Ball Valve
Crane Ball Valve

This is an early Crane ball valve from the 60's. The brass plate on top allows the plumber to install the handle in either direction, a novel feature that even our current ball valves don't have.
Crane CAT.440
Crane CAT.440

This is what all the above crane valves looked like before they were cleaned. The brass on this one is so tarnished it could pass for steel. This particular valve's handle doesn't turn, and the gate is frozen in the lowered postition. You can see the packing has been leaking but otherwise it is in good shape and will clean up nicely.
Old Galvanized Pipe
Here you can see why all these valves will inevitably be replaced. It is the galvanized pipe they are connected to that rusts out and either leaks or kills water pressure. If this valve had been connected to copper pipe it would most likely still be in service.
Crane Catalogue
Crane Catalogue #53

This 1952 Catalogue has 580 pages and it dosen't even include all Crane's products. At one point Crane was producing 40 train box-car loads of product every day and had branches all over the U.S. and Canada.
Page 14
Names of Parts

Here you can see cutaways for all the brass gate valves in Crane's catalogue. In this list the higher the number the more robust the valve and the higher the pressure it could handle.

I've made scans of the corresponding pages to the above Crane valves so you can see the original specs and prices, recommended uses, etc.
Page 15
Crane CAT.410

100-Pound Brass Gate Valves

Wedge Disc Non Rising Stem
Page 16
Crane CAT.440

125-Pound Brass Gate Valves

Rising Stem
Page 23
Crane CAT.431-UB

150-Pound Bronze Gate Valve

Wedge Disc Non Rising Stem
Page 32
Crane CAT.7

150-Pound Brass Globe Valve

 

 

 

 

 

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Last modified: 01/20/11